Heterochromia from UK :)

She is a model I saw her picture on a magazine cover, I have found her name and immediately contacted her 🙂 Her name is Topaz, absolutely gorgeous girl that happen to come to Amsterdam for another photo shoot and joined Heterochromia project as well 🙂

Topaz did not take her lenses out until the very last moment before the shoot. She say she is very insecure about her eyes, but i am sure that one day this beautiful condition will bring her even more fame then she can imagine 🙂

Thank you, Topaz! I am hoping to see you again! 🙂

 

“I am so thankful of my heterochromatic eyes. I speak, love and smile with them. They have become my distinctive beauty and strength in self belief.”

“While the kids were just curious, it sometimes made me feel like an animal in a zoo”

I love my eyes! Although, when I was younger I quickly became self conscious of the attention I would receive as a result of my eyes. I have memories from when I was at school of kids surrounding me to try get a better look at my eyes. While the kids were just curious, it sometimes made me feel like an animal in a zoo or something! The comments I receive about my eyes are always positive, and always have been. Generally people find them interesting and want to know how my eyes came to be that way. I remember one boy from school never believed me when I said my eyes were natural, and was convinced that I wore contact lenses. It became a bit of a game trying to convince him otherwise! 🙂 I am lucky that my eyes never resulted in me been bullied or anything like that

 

“Blessed are those who see beauty in imperfection, for you teach the world to see through different eyes”

heterochromia_project2Back when I was young people would ask me why my eyes were the way they are.
I just responded that I had two souls, or that I had eaten my twin when I was in the womb, or that on my planet this was very normal.

Blessed are those who see beauty in imperfection, for you teach the world to see through different eyes. -Jamiro Oort 2017

WHY?…

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“Yes, but why are you doing this?”

If I would ask for a penny for each and every “WHY” question I get during the process of heterochromia photography project, I would probably be able to support the whole project and photograph all heterochromia in the world 🙂

So … coming to the “WHY” part…

To be honest I see myself as a medium to express heterochromia. It can be various channels and there were not as many so far, that is why I stand out and get asked all those questions…

At the beginning I was curious, and now – I receive “thank you” emails every day and, indeed, it is empowering, it keeps me going, keeps me engaged, related, responsible, and it is not something that comes from me directly anymore, it is something that you, guys, trigger in me and I just keep going.I have heard so many stories and I could never imagine that such beauty as different coloured eyes could evoke so much trouble… make people feel insecure, neglected, rejected, change their lives in the most unexpected way…

I have heard so many stories and I could never imagine that such beauty as different coloured eyes could evoke so much trouble… make people feel insecure, neglected, rejected, change their lives in the most unexpected way…

So… the truth is that I simply find it important. I want to tell those stories, show heterochromia people, introduce them, transmit them,  so than the rest of the population can just accept heterochromia instead of rejecting it… Confused mind say NO, so let’s not be confused anymore, we all are different and this is the only way to develop and become more, be bigger and rather focus our energy on growth instead of fighting the obvious.

Confused mind say NO, so let’s not be confused anymore, we all are different and accepting it is the only way to develop and become more, be bigger and rather focus our energy on growth instead of fighting the obvious.

Viva heterochromia! there are not that many unique things left… let’s just embrace it…

 

 

“I just hope any other heterochromia-kids out there aren’t going through the bullying I went through”

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I was born with bright blue eyes, on 7th November 1995 in Sheffield, England. My eyes seemed completely “normal” and no one suspected that they would change. When I was around 12-18 months old, my left eye gradually started turning brown. My mum, as you can imagine, was extremely worried and took me to the hospital. I can’t remember much, but I’m told that the doctors did lots of tests – apparently a change in eye colour can sujest problems with your internal organs.

After many many tests, everything seemed to be fine and the doctor told me it was like a freckled or a birth mark. So that’s what I went with for the first 14 or so years of my life. Whenever anyone asked what was “wrong” with my eye, I simply replied “it’s a freckle”. I’ve had the weirdest questions: “did you eat your twin?”, “are you two people?”, “are you blind?’. But my answer was always the same.

Life wasn’t particularly pleasant at school, I was bullied a lot because of my “odd eyes”. I hated them, despised them in fact. It wasn’t until one of my high school biology teaches brought up the subject of heterochromia, that I really started to research it. I soon found out that it was very unique and the majority of online opinions were very positive.

It took a while for me to be comfortable with my eyes, still at the age of 20 I am no where near 100% confident about them. But I now tell people its a mutation called heterochromia and I am happy that I am unique. I also quite enjoy being a “mutant”, it makes me sound more interesting than I actually am!

I just hope any other heterochromia-kids out there aren’t going through the bullying I went through, I hope they know they’re very very lucky and very very beautiful.

Jade.

I’m 40 years old now, but it’s taken me about 35 years to embrace my eyes

I’m 40 years old now, but it’s taken me about 35 years to embrace my eyes…

Being adopted almost added onto the dealing of being weird – different when I was a little girl, people always pointed it out and asked me silly questions about did I see the same in each eye… My brothers called me a witch….

I could be talking to a stranger when suddenly they would interrupt me and say “hey! You’ve got 2 different coloured eyes”! – kinda felt like a freak show at times…

Do I feel different from others? Yes!! And it’s taken me this long to love it!! I feel it’s a blessing and I feel it’s a mark of something precious, mysterious!

I’ve just become a grandmother, and trust me, I watch my grand daughters eyes all the time to see if she has changes! I totally love it!

“I met thousands different people, but none of them was like me”

 heterochromia project
heterochromia project

During 20 years of my life, I met thousands different people, but none of them was like me.

As a child, I always considered myself weird, creepy and a bit of a freak. I felt like I do not belong.
Kids in my school would question me if I see everything in green and brown colours and when I asked if they see the world in blue, they realised how stupid the question was. I think they felt sorry for me.
Then, during my teenage years I was annoyed when every magazine advised what eye shadow a girl should use to match their iris. What if I have more than one colour ha? (and yes, it was a 1st world problem for a 15-year-old me ;)). On every single photograph, the difference in colour was so visible and I hated it. Again, freak.

In my head, I knew somebody up there is having a lot of fun…

Now, I love myself the way I am. People still do not believe me that my eyes are REAL, but I do not care anymore what everyone else think. I am different but I feel good about it. I feel unique.
The norm is boring, heterochromia is much more fun!

“One of the best parts of my heterochromia is that faith already decided it for me, way back in time before I even existed”

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